A Christian With Bipolar Disorder

Hey Guys 🙂

I feel like I keep apologizing for this each time I post, but I am sorry for my absence lately.

I have been thinking a lot. There have been many changes going on in my life at the moment. Good changes but not without its growing pains.

To those of you who read my blog and relate to the challenges of mental illness, I am sure some of you can relate to what I am about to tell you.

As someone with bipolar disorder, I have moments where I have all the energy in the world. I can multitask like nobody’s business and about 3 hours sleep is all I need. I become super social and everything is rainbows and butterflies.Too bad those periods of mania couldn’t last a little longer!

Currently, I can safely say, I am not going through a manic phase right now. More like a “I don’t care” phase. Not super depressed to the point of suicidal thoughts or anything like that but just simply “blah”. Low energy, lack of motivation, lack of appetite. Content to hibernate in my house. It’s nothing personal…it just is.

I can feel this indifference starting to lift hence why you see this post today. I am slowly but surely starting to have the drive to write again but here’s the thing. I cannot promise consistent posting at this time.

I have tried this before and eventually I have to just go away for a bit. The catch 22 of the disorder. Trying to find balance and consistency. It’s certainly not easy and hands down the biggest frustration I have with bipolar disorder.

So yeah, if you see me fall of the map for a little bit, chances are I am going through a low period.

Like I mentioned earlier, I have been thinking a lot. I have been noting some of the ways having bipolar disorder effects things like my work, interests, activities, my relationships and yes even my faith in God.

Before I really started embracing my faith, I never really gave this concept much thought but I am starting to see that my faith becomes altered depending on which end of the bipolar spectrum I’m on.

For the most part, things are fairly balanced. I take medication. I see my doctors on a consistent basis. Despite that, it’s not a cure. I am still going to have bipolar moments.

When I experience mania, I notice my faith and desire to keep God at the top of my list quite easy. I make note of Him everyday. I am more willing to contribute and going to church is a happy social event for me.

When I am experiencing the depression side of things, I start to question my faith, going to church becomes a challenge, the main reason being, I don’t feel comfortable around people during that time. The public social outing I normally enjoy becomes riddled with anxiety and a lack of interest in general.

Sometimes I wonder, is it possible to be a true follower of God when your views and beliefs tend to shift because of mental illness?

I guess I throw the question out there because I honestly don’t know the answer. All I do know is I believe in God and I believe He is with me always. I have been posed the question “Are you a fan or a follower of God” At this point, I know I am not a true follower if I measure it against a list of criteria, however at the end of the day I do believe.

My fear is, if being a true follower requires more than simply believing then how I am ever going to achieve follower status when my brain has shifts in mood and thought that are sometimes very hard to control?

I would enjoy any thoughts or discussions on the matter. Am I the only one who has pondered this? Are there other Christians out there living with mental illness who face the same struggle?

Take Care ❤

Cavelle

Bipolar Remission. Is It Possible?

Hey guys 🙂

Today I want to talk about something that does not seem to get enough attention when it comes to bipolar disorder and that is remission.

Can bipolar disorder be cured? No. Not at this time anyway but the truth is you can lead a healthy and productive life! Remission may not be the same for everyone but it is achievable.

When I first started my blog I had just been diagnosed with the disorder which is about 3 years ago now. I was far from a remission state at the time and to top it all off I was not in a healthy environment/relationship for my emotional wellbeing. Needless to say remission was not on the horizon at the time and my symptoms of mania, depression and anxiety (I have GAD as well) was all over the place. Can you say mixed episodes? Oh how they plagued my life at the time…

Move to present day and things are a lot different. I see a therapist and I visit my psychiatrist on a regular basis. My meds are stable (for once), I’m holding down a job although I did have to switch to part time (which has helped tremendously) I don’t abuse substances and I am in a loving, healthy relationship.

I am not saying these things to brag but I have earned my current state of remission. I have worked hard to change my life around and make sure my environment is a healthy one.

The reason I am writing about this is because many times the articles I would write or read are very doom and gloom and personally I think that can add to the stigma that goes along with mental illnesses in general. Why are we not celebrating the good that can be achieved despite the hurdles?

For instance, the amount of empathy people with mental disorders display. Since starting my blog I have met so many wonderful people and have received much support in the mental health community and attribute that to my current healthy state. I am very thankful for that and glad I can extend the same olive branch.

I am not my bipolar disorder and refuse to let that define me as a whole. I live with the disorder yes and it is not going anywhere and in the beginning stages I felt like everything including my identity had to revolve around being mentally ill.

But think about the trials and tribulations you have gone through in your life. Sometimes the depression kicks in and it’s crippling. Other times it’s the mania that gets the best of you and the “crash” kicks in but you are still standing, you are strong and those of us with mental illness have much more to offer than we think sometimes.

I am not trying to candy coat mental illness by any means but why are we not celebrating the victories big or small more often? Why does mental illness always have to be portrayed as negative. In some cases I have witnessed people in a pissing contest of sorts on who has it worse and honestly, how does that help anything except perpetuate the stigma?

Those of you fighting the good fight, I challenge you to see the positives of living with a mental illness. As a community we have much to offer this world and more insight and compassion than most despite the challenges we face and we should be celebrating that to the fullest!

Just a thought.

Take Care! ❤

Cavelle